Like Nick Patrick, I too assumed that American and English pronunciation became distinct after the Revolution as American English diverged from British English. It turns out, however, to have been the other way around. Contemporary American English is far closer to the common tongue we and the Brits shared at the time of the Revolution – British English diverged shortly after the Revolution as a trendy “prestige” form of English took root in the mother country. More from Nick, and greater detail from The Cambridge History of the English Language. Hat Tip: Courtney.

Hans

Hans Schantz is CTO of The Q-Track Corporation, and a co-inventor of NFER® technology. His prior work experience includes stints with IBM, the Lawrence Livermore National Lab, The ElectroScience Lab of the Ohio State University, and Time Domain Corporation. Author of The Art and Science of Ultra-wideband Antennas (Artech House, 2005), his forty U.S. patents include antennas, RF systems, RF-based location systems, and related inventions. He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, a member of the Institute of Navigation, and an amateur radio operator [KC5VLD]. Schantz earned his Ph.D. in physics from the University of Texas at Austin. He also holds degrees in Industrial Engineering and Physics from Purdue University. Dr. Schantz blogs at ÆtherCzar and is @ÆtherCzar on Twitter. His wife, Barbara, invented The Baby Dipper® Bowl. Hans and Barbara have two sets of twins: girls aged nine, and boys six years old. The views expressed are the author's and are not necessarily the views of his employer, clients, investors, sponsors, or customers.

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